Whoosh! Issue 70 - July 2002

INSIDE THE HEAD OF STEVEN L. SEARS
By Amy Murphy
Content © 2002 held by author
WHOOSH! Edition © (c) 2002 held by WHOOSH
6235 words


Introduction (01)
Steve's Head (02-184)
Steve's Résumé
Acknowledgments
Articles
Biography



INSIDE THE HEAD OF STEVEN L. SEARS



I said round up the usual suspects, not the unusual ones!

Steve Sears, head intact.




Introduction

[01]After seeing Mr. Sears at the big convention in Los Angeles, I had a feeling that this guy was not only talented, but also a very kind soul. I was right on all accounts. He is down to earth and is another who cares about the "fans". The interview that this busy man honored me with left me with a warm fuzzy feeling! He is very charming and extremely funny, and also "What A Man!" Let us get to know this talented soul.


Steve's Head


Interviewer:
[02]Why did you start writing?

Steven L. Sears:
[03]I guess my first attempt at actually writing a script was in 1983 sometime. I had never trained or studied to be a writer. I was an actor. I had a degree in Theatre and I had been performing on stage since I was 13 years old. Mostly regional theatre and school related stuff. But I headed out to Los Angeles with the express purpose of being an Actor. I didn't even know you could make a living as a Writer. And, I must confess I fell to the common sin of not even thinking of Writers as being a necessary part of production. Doh! But after doing a few small acting things (General Hospital, if you can believe it) I started writing audition scenes to use when meeting casting directors. These were just three-minute scenes. They became popular and other actors started using them.

[04]One day, a casting director (Harriet Helberg of Benson) saw some of my scenes and told me I should think about writing a script. I told her I couldn't do that, lots of typing, sixty pages, etc. But when I got home, I pulled out a script I had gotten of some show and realized that a script is several three minute scenes, just put in order. So I figured I would give it a shot. Who would know? Well, the result was the worst script that has ever been written. But I discovered that I LOVED writing. So I thought I would try it again. About one year later, I was on staff at Stephen Cannell Productions on a series called Riptide.

Interviewer:
[05]If you had to do it all over, would you be a writer?

Sears:
[06]Absolutely! I'd dress better, though. And probably have a more regimented workout program.

Interviewer:
[07]Give us a brief day in the life of Steve.

Sears:
[08]There is no such thing. A day in the life, I mean. Each day is different. When I am in production, I am doing several different things at the same time. Aside from writing scripts, I am overseeing all the other facets of production. From editing to costuming to music, etc. etc. I also hire the actors and the directors as well as the writers. I work with my other producers on elements of the show and assign them their duties (I have GREAT producers!). During the worst of it, I'm in the office by eight, work there until eight at night, go home and start writing at ten p.m. and finish sometime between one and two. Then I start all over again. On easier days, I get two extra hours. At the moment, because the show Sheena is on hiatus, I spend my days going to the gym, taking meetings with studio execs and other producers, and finishing up the postproduction on the last few shows.

Interviewer:
[09]How do you handle stress?

Sears:
[10]Stress? WHAT STRESS?????????? Well, it's hard to say. I get outdoors, try to do things that are active: golf, skiing, hiking, etc. Or, and this is the strange part, I like to write. I'm very lucky in that I happen to love what I do for a living so I would probably do it just for fun. I listen to music and I think of strange things that can be turned into screenplays or series.

Interviewer:
[11]Years from now, how would you want to be remembered?

Sears:
[12]I'll be surprised if I'm remembered at all. I don't really think in those terms. I don't really do anything for the purpose of being remembered. So I can't even think how I would like to be remembered.

Interviewer:
[13]What is your pet peeve?

Sears:
[14]Inconsideration. People with no common sense. People who assume that you will take the burden of their mistakes. And Ostriches.

Interviewer:
[15]Who is Steve?

Sears:
[16]You don't know? Hmmm... maybe you sent this interview to the wrong Steve. Well, I wish I had something profound to say about myself, but I take the Popeye approach to self-realization: I yam what I yam. Nothing more. Nothing less.

Interviewer:
[17]What is the most sensitive part on your body?

Sears:
[18]Okay... I see where this is going. Hmm... Not sure I can answer that. Another interview, another time... another moral ethic... .

Interviewer:
[19]What do you see yourself doing in the future? Any future projects?

Sears:
[20]Well, I would hope that I can continue in the field that I am in. Maybe branch out into directing and features. I'm pretty happy in television, but I wouldn't mind a divergence here and there. I have a job jar filled with stories and series ideas . I have more than I will ever be able to do in one lifetime. In the short term future, I'd just like to unpack all the boxes in my house and get everything put away.

Interviewer:
[21]How do you handle depression?

Sears:
[22]Hmmm... . Well, if I'm down about something, or just feeling down in general, I like to make a list of the things that might be bothering me and center in on the major cause. Once I have that figured out, it's a matter of solving that one problem.

Interviewer:
[23]What advice can you give to future writers?

Sears:
[24]I'm afraid the advice I would give is pretty standard. Perseverance. Also remember that this is a BUSINESS. It has to be treated as such. And, because it is a business, it is easy to find people who are ready to take advantage of you. Face it, many would do almost anything to achieve their dreams. That will be tested. I think you define yourself more by what you say "no" to, as opposed to what you agree to. Oh, yeah, another thing. There is a "creative triad" in the business: Actors, Writers, Directors. They are often at odds with each other in an industry that depends on working together. No matter which one you choose, take time to learn what it is the other two do and what they have to go through to accomplish it. You'll go a lot farther in this business if you do. And never forget to kiss your significant other and hug the kids.

Interviewer:
[25]What are your dreams? Hopes? Wishes?

Sears:
[26]To continue having fun. I don't take life lightly, but I try to enjoy it. It's the one I've got right now, so I want to enjoy it. That means continuing to work, having good friends, and traveling. God, I sound like a beer commercial!

Interviewer:
[27]Who do you trust?

Sears:
[28]I am cautious, but I generally give everyone the benefit of the doubt when I first meet them. So I'm easy to trust people, but I keep an eye out. It's up to the other person to destroy that trust and, once they do, it's not easily rebuilt. I can say that I have three or four truly close friends who I would trust implicitly to make decisions on my behalf.

Interviewer:
[29]What is the stupidest thing you have ever been asked?

Sears:
[30]"Who's the most famous person you've ever slept with?" To which I responded "Me".

Interviewer:
[31]What are you tired of being asked?

Sears:
[32]"So, how's Roebuck?"

Interviewer:
[33]What would you say every writer needs?

Sears:
[34]An ability to feel for others. That's to say the ability to put oneself, even marginally, into another person's perspective. Whether it's the characters on the page, or the executive you have to deal with. You have to be able to drop your preconceptions and take on another's. The biggest test of success is if you can do that with a character who has opinions and feelings that you disagree with. And make that person convincing.

Interviewer:
[35]Do you believe in prayer?

Sears:
[36]I don't pray. But I believe that other people have the need to. And if that is what connects them and soothes them, so much the better.

Interviewer:
[37]Ever have a bad experience with an actor or on the set?

Sears:
[38]Yep. I had one tell me to get the F- off the set. I didn't. It caused a big row. That particular actor had a history of flying off at people and it caught up to him. I know several jobs where he has been passed on because of the difficulty with working with him. Something to remember when you are heading up the ladder.

Interviewer:
[39]What makes your best friend your best friend?

Sears:
[40]Hard to say. This goes back to the trust question. But the three or four "best" friends I have are people I can lose touch with for months or years and, when we hook back up, it's like we never left.

Interviewer:
[41]What was the last thing that made you smile recently?

Sears:
[42]I saw a little kid looking under the bathroom stall doors and saying "hi" to the people inside. Everyone said "hi" right back to him.

Interviewer:
[43]What made you angry?

Sears:
[44]Can't go into detail, but I was pretty angry. I'm not very loud when I get angry. I'm pretty quiet and intense. But it was a lie that someone told right to my face, in front of other people, knowing full well that he was lying to me. He was thinking the other people being there would protect him. He was wrong. And his lie hurt someone he and I both know.

Interviewer:
[45]You now have absolute authority over the world. Omnipotent in all areas. What's your first move?

Sears:
[46]King's Bishop to Queen's Knight three; check. And I'd enforce the ten item limit in grocery lines. Other than that, fix the world hunger thing, peace on earth, clear up some misunderstandings.

Interviewer:
[47]Do fans scare you?

Sears:
[48]No. Not yet, anyway. I haven't run into any who actually scare me. Most fans are pretty much like myself. They have an intense passion for something and they show it. Hey, good for them that they allow themselves to show it. Most people don't.

Interviewer:
[49]Do you have stalkers? If so, how have you handled them?

Sears:
[50]Either I don't have any stalkers, or I have stalkers who are very very good at what they do. I've had at least one person volunteer to be my stalker.

Interviewer:
[51]How would you categorize your best writing?

Sears:
[52]My best? It would be something that affects someone in some way. Whether to make them smile or feel or be touched. Something that can suspend the audience in the moment and make them see into the character's soul and feel for them. Whether or not I have ever achieved that is up to the individual audience member.

Interviewer:
[53]If you had thirty seconds to live, what would you think, feel or say?

Sears:
[54]"30... 29... 28... 27... 26... "

Interviewer:
[55]What stupid thing did you do as a teen?

Sears:
[56]Alphabetically? I have a whole list. I played capture the fort with the Castillo De San Marcos, got mistaken for a robbery suspect and was almost shot. I rode in a canoe on top of a car and the canoe came loose. I was making an 8mm science fiction in my backyard with pyrotechnics using firecrackers and gasoline. The list goes on... .

Interviewer:
[57]What, if anything, can stop you from writing?

Sears:
[58]Death, I imagine, though it's not a sure bet. Depends on whether they use Windows XP on the other side.

Interviewer:
[59]In your opinion, do you fit your astrological sign?

Sears:
[60]I don't follow astrology. I am a Capricorn, but friends who are in the know about this stuff tell me I lean toward Sagittarius. Eh.

Interviewer:
[61]What to you is the worst feeling in the world?

Sears:
[62]Fear.

Interviewer:
[63]The best feeling in the world?

Sears:
[64]Blind, nonsensical Love. Pretty standard, actually.

Interviewer:
[65]Favorite song of the moment?

Sears:
[66]Of the moment? Hmmm... . So much of my life involves music it's hard to narrow it down. I like all kinds of music (yes, even rap). It would really depend on what I am listening to at the moment. Some songs are continual favorites, like the song "Old and Wise" by Alan Parsons. Dvorak's ninth symphony "New World" is a favorite. Hard to say.

Interviewer:
[67]What is the first thing you think of in the morning?

Sears:
[68]"I wonder how far I can throw that buzzy-ringy thing?"

Interviewer:
[69]Do fans expect too much from actors?

Sears:
[70]In general, no. Most fans are pretty respectful of actors and actors generally understand the position they have put themselves with their popularity. However, the few who aren't color all the rest. Most fans know that they are human beings with their own flaws. And actors have to understand that they voluntarily chose a career that has certain "dangers" attached to it. I have been with well known actors in public and, yes, it's true that they get stared at and people walk right up to them and start talking. I think it only gets irritating when people decide they have the right to voice their unsolicited opinion about your work or series.

Interviewer:
[71]What can you say to soothe the hurting Xena fans?

Sears:
[72]There is nothing I can say that will do that. For those who hurt, they have good reason and there is nothing I can say that will bring that down. Just saying "it was only a TV show" doesn't quite do it and, besides, it invalidates all they invested in it.

Interviewer:
[73]Why do you think a majority of the Xena fan are hurting?

Sears:
[74]There are many who aren't hurting. And there are many who are hurting because of Xena's death; because of the way she died; because the subtext issue wasn't handled the way they wanted; because they feel betrayed; there are many reasons. It can vary quite a bit, but there is a core there somewhere.

Interviewer:
[75]How is Sheena going?

Sears:
[76]Going very well from a creative/production standpoint. The studio is very happy with the series, especially for the money we spend. I have an incredible cast and crew and my major leads are wonderful to work with. The ratings are not where we would like them, but the studio is reluctant to pull us because they believe in us. Better time slots would certainly solve most of the problem. I'm very proud of the show and, more importantly, of the people who have put it together. The recent events, however, have made it even harder for the show to continue. We were rushed in our second season and didn't get to do a lot of the things that I wanted to do, but these things take time. Hopefully we'll have the time to do it. [Sadly, Sheena has been cancelled and will not continue into a third season].

Interviewer:
[77]Is there one part of the writing process where you usually get stuck?

Sears:
[78]The story phase is always the hardest. Once I have a story outline, the script moves fairly well. But coming up with the twists and turns is difficult. Also coming up with ways to fool the audience and convincing other people in the production that it will work. When I write a script that has a twist for the audience, it's usually something I can already see in my head, but might not be apparent to someone who is just reading it. So it might take some explanation or arm twisting to get it done. But once it's done, people can see what I was writing and it either works or it doesn't.

Interviewer:
[79]In your writing, what have you tried to change, and was it successful or not successful?

Sears:
[80]I've gotten better at writing, that's for sure. But it's still a difficult process. You are trying to create from nothing. In some ways, it gives you complete freedom. But it most ways, it's frustrating. You come up with a dozen little points or scenes that you want to see. Now you have to play connect-the-dots and put them all together in a way that makes sense. The problem is that the "dots" aren't always on the same page or, in many cases, contradict each other just by where they are. Confusing, I know, but take my word for it. It's a mess at times.

Interviewer:
[81]Does the best writing flow for you, or does it come from rewrites?

Sears:
[82]Rewrites are always more enjoyable. With every version, you close in on the mistakes and find solutions. Most of the time, those solutions offer opportunities to exploit. But just putting the flesh on the skeleton for the first time is the most difficult of that process, second to outlining the story.

Interviewer:
[83]Which part of writing/directing do you enjoy most and why?

Sears:
[84]The creating of a new world and seeing people immerse themselves in it. That means anyone who reads the script, production people to audience. I also like what I call the "ooo yeah!" I borrowed the term from George Carlin. It's that moment in the script/episode/pitch where the audience suddenly goes "Ooo yeah!!!"

Interviewer:
[85]How often do you think about a piece when you're working on it and when do you think about it?

Sears:
[86]All the time, every time. I was known for suddenly stopping what I was doing, no matter where or what, and asking for a pen and paper to write something down. You can't shut it off. When you are caught up in a story, it won't leave you alone. You are constantly trying to solve problems and your brain won't let it go. Amazing little organ, that brain.

Interviewer:
[87]When someone walks into your bedroom, what are the first five things that they're likely to notice?

Sears:
[88]The bed isn't made; the enormous amount of books and magazines on the bedtables, the camera equipment on the floor, the dog-step next to the bed, and the laundry hamper is full. I usually take the trapeze and disco ball down when I have company. Or put them up depending on the company.

Interviewer:
[89]Do you feel in control of your writing, or do you get carried away by your inspiration or characters?

Sears:
[90]Ultimately, I am in control. But I allow myself to let the characters take control. I let everything explore for itself. If I find something that I can use, I use it. If not, I go back to my original thinking. The most fun is to just let it go and see where it ends up. Sometimes you just go along for the ride, knowing it's not going where it should. You can always fix it later.

Interviewer:
[91]Tell the truth--are you your favorite writer, or in your own top five?

Sears:
[92]No, not even in the top five. I enjoy writing. I don't know if I enjoy reading my writing. I mean, I think I am good, but I wouldn't call myself my favorite writer. Creativity is such a subjective thing. There is no way I can judge myself. People keep paying to me to write, so I must be good at something. But that is the only yardstick I have to measure my work by.

Interviewer:
[93]Would the world be a better place if women ran it or would it be basically the same?

Sears:
[94]It would be different. It means we would have different problems and different solutions. I don't think either gender can claim the moral high ground as far as the world is concerned.

Interviewer:
[95]What is your favorite spot where you live now?

Sears:
[96]Right over there. Next to the heating vent.

Interviewer:
[97]What books are you reading now? What about it/them is holding your attention?

Sears:
[98]I read several books at once. Usually, I read non-fiction because they are easier to put down and pick up again later. With my schedule, I don't get to read things front to back real quickly. Lately, though, I've been reading Jeff Shaara's "Rise to Rebellion", a study of the American Revolution. Also "Rising Sun Victorious", which is a compilation of historians views of a theoretical Japanese victory in WW II. "The Kennedy Tapes", which are transcripts of J.F.K.'s oval office meetings during the Cuban missile crisis. A book on Religion through the ages. I'm also giving Kevin J. Anderson's books a whirl right now. Rebecca Moestra's will be next, I'm sure.

Interviewer:
[99]What would your friends say is your worst trait?

Sears:
[100]That I'm too humble. Hah!

Interviewer:
[101]What is the longest any plant in your home has been with you?

Sears:
[102]Plants do not last with me. Even the mere thought of living in my home has killed plants. If I go to a plant store and say "that one!" you can bet that it will be demised by the time it gets to my car. My aura could kill a Triffid.

Interviewer:
[103]Do you have any particular bedtime rituals that you follow every night?

Sears:
[104]Nothing really ritualistic. I like to read myself to sleep, but usually when I hit the bed, I'm out. The problem is in the timing. I tend to stay up real late and screw up my cycle. Not very healthy, no, but the down time between jobs is when I recharge.

Interviewer:
[105]If you find a spider in the bathtub, do you help it out or squish it?

Sears:
[106]If I can, I will take it outside. But if I can't, and I deem it a risk to my dogs, it gets a quick, but respectful, death.

Interviewer:
[107]What was the last thing you bought that you really didn't need?

Sears:
[108]A car. Another car. D-mn.

Interviewer:
[109]Have you ever smoked cigarettes?

Sears:
[110]Nope. When I was eight years old, my dad (who was a chain smoker) was sitting in his easy chair smoking. I said to him "I want to smoke one". He lifted me on his lap and made me smoke an entire cigarette. I was sick for a day. I never touched another cigarette (or any other smoking substance, for that matter).

Interviewer:
[111]Who is your favorite Greek God?

Sears:
[112]Although I don't know a lot about him, it was one of the brothers of Zeus named Dull. I was going to write an episode where Joxer gets a patron god and, it figures, his name is Dull. I wanted him to be played by Rodney Dangerfield or Buddy Hackett.

Interviewer:
[113]Why do fools fall in love?

Sears:
[114]Uhm... because we are fools? A fool in love is only a fool to those who have none or too much.

Interviewer:
[115]Do you keep a diary?

Sears:
[116]No, not anymore. I used to keep a journal, but I was only putting things in there that bothered me, so it became pretty depressing. So I got rid of it.

Interviewer:
[117]What skill would you like to have that you don't have now?

Sears:
[118]Time management in my life. I think that's a skill. And I don't have it!

Interviewer:
[119]Who is your real life hero and why?

Sears:
[120]I can't really come up with an answer to that. I guess it's because I see heroes every day. Teachers, cops, firepersons, people who sacrifice for others. I know, it sounds sappy. But I think that the things that happened in New York have shown us that heroes are all around us. You just don't know who they are until afterward.

Interviewer:
[121]Would you like to act?

Sears:
[122]Been there, done that. I was an Actor when I started out, as I mentioned before. So I have acted and it's fun. But I love what I do now too much to leave it. I have been asked to act in TV episodes, though. But, so far, I've turned the offers down. Most recently I was asked to act and SING! Nope. Not gonna happen. Uh, uh.

Interviewer:
[123]Is it hard to write a love scene?

Sears:
[124]Love scene or sex scene? There's a difference. I don't find it hard to write either. I mean, it's a challenge to write any scene with integrity, but not particularly hard in comparison. The key is to write it in a manner that is unexpected, but still rings a chord in people's hearts.

Interviewer:
[125]What can you say to people who hand you scripts?

Sears:
[126]"I can't read this, I'm sorry." I get handed a lot of scripts and I couldn't possibly read them all. If I do agree to read a script, I make sure they know that if I agree to do that, I intend to tell them the truth. I'll be diplomatic, but it does no one any good to lie about it. Sometimes I'll tell people that I might read something, but it won't be for a while. What they don't understand is that phrase "for a while" could mean years.

Interviewer:
[127]How would you describe your parents?

Sears:
[128]Wonderful. I had great parents. Perfect? No. But they dedicated themselves to making us a family. When my parents passed on, I never had to worry that I hadn't said everything or still had issues unresolved. I was very open with them and, as I grew older, they were open to me. I was extremely blessed in the parent department.

Interviewer:
[129]What is the hardest thing you ever had to do?

Sears:
[130]Say goodbye to my mother.

Interviewer:
[131]What was the easiest?

Sears:
[132]Typing the letter "r". It's right there, right where my finger can hit it.

Interviewer:
[133]What movie touched you so much that you still remember it vividly?

Sears:
[134]I remember a lot of movies vividly. A curse, I guess. I love "Cross Creek". That was one of them. "She's Having A Baby" is a real good one for pulling heartstrings.

Interviewer:
[135]If you could only choose a single climate with no variation would you prefer it to be sweltering hot or freezing cold?

Sears:
[136]COLD COLD COLD! I like the cold! I hate the heat! I live in Los Angeles and work in Orlando. I am out of my mind.

Interviewer:
[137]What is the first thing you notice about someone when you meet them?

Sears:
[138]How they regard other people. That includes service people. People project themselves without even knowing by how they handle other people.

Interviewer:
[139]Have you ever done something that accidentally caused something really bad to happen to someone?

Sears:
[140]God, I hope not. Certainly not that I'm aware of.

Interviewer:
[141]How is $25 well spent?

Sears:
[142]By buying one of those ornaments on one of those Children's Charity Christmas trees.

Interviewer:
[143]Would you rather live in a sociable suburb, or alone in the deep woods?

Sears:
[144]Deep woods. I guess I'm a closet hermit. Actually, most friends consider me a social hermit. I appreciate the attention, but it embarrasses me. Love/hate relationship with myself, I guess.

Interviewer:
[145]What literary character did you most identify with as a child?

Sears:
[146]Jupiter Jones (look him up). http://www.palacecreations.com/3inv.html

Interviewer:
[147]What is the source of your inspiration?

Sears:
[148]An unbridled imagination and one heck of a fantasy life. And I guess a wry way of looking at things.

Interviewer:
[149]Where do your ideas come from?

Sears:
[150]Muncie, Indiana. Oh, heck, I have no idea. Seriously. I get ideas all the time. All you have to do is look at things and ask "Hey, what if... ?"

Interviewer:
[151]What do you find most satisfying about your job?

Sears:
[152]I enjoy putting an episode together. There are so many different elements involved in making a TV show. It's like piling three tons of scrap junk metal in a Kansas wheat field and hoping a tornado will turn it into a Cadillac. I enjoy that.

Interviewer:
[153]What are the three things you enjoy most about writing?

Sears:
[154]Finishing the first draft, rewriting it, and getting response (good or bad). I also enjoy typing. Good thing, all considered.

Interviewer:
[155]What were your favorite book, TV show, and movie when you were a teenager?

Sears:
[156]Boy, you expect me to think back that far? I have several. You might have noticed I'm not one for "favorites". Favorite book? The Foundation Trilogy or Lord of the Rings. TV Show? Ten Speed and Brown Shoes. Movie? Valley of Gwangi. But those are just some of them.

Interviewer:
[157]What's your idea of a perfect world?

Sears:
[158]Perfection would be boring, so, therefore not perfect. Probably a world where people truly cared how their actions affected others.

Interviewer:
[159]How real is your writing to you?

Sears:
[160]It's my joy and source of income. It's also the source of incredible frustration and stress. It's very real on all fronts.

Interviewer:
[161]What Disney character do you most identify with and why?

Sears:
[162]Well, considering that I am doing Sheena at the moment, I'd say Mowgli. But more the Mowgli from the Kipling book. For Disney characters, let's go with King Louie.

Interviewer:
[163]When you were a kid what did you want to be when you grew up?

Sears:
[164]An adult. And I'm still waiting for that to happen. I don't know. I guess I always dreamed of being an actor, but I didn't really think it was possible at that age. I went into college pre-med until Chem-101 knocked me into Liberal Arts. There was a year or two of struggling to find out what I really wanted to do. The entire time I was still doing acting and loving it. One day, people started talking about the movie "The Good-Bye Girl" and saying how much Richard Dreyfuss was playing ME (my personality and the like). Then he won an Oscar for that role. I remember thinking "Well, only special people get that". I had an epiphany at that moment. I stopped and thought "If Richard Dreyfuss had had that attitude, he WOULDN'T have won it." So I decided to change my major to Theatre and that was that. I'm long since beyond the idea of winning awards, but it was a turning point in my growth.

Interviewer:
[165]What are the limits in sacrifices for true love?

Sears:
[166]That's an individual thing to decide. We all have limits, whether we want to admit them or not. Love doesn't conquer all, but it makes things WORTH conquering.

Interviewer:
[167]If you could interview your favorite actor, what questions would you ask?

Sears:
[168]Want to read a script?

Interviewer:
[169]What makes a great kisser?

Sears:
[170]Oh, ho... here we go. Well, someone who takes their time and truly puts their soul into it. Someone who doesn't force it, but entices it. Someone who knows when to start... and when to stop... when to tease... . Hey, hey, hey! What kinda interview are you running here???

Interviewer:
[171]What have you learned from your animals?

Sears:
[172]That stomachs expand to accommodate the amount of food provided. My dogs are the family I have right now and I care quite a bit about them. It's a fact that people who have pets live a little longer. It's because they relieve some of the stress in our lives. They have definitely done that for me.

Interviewer:
[173]Does our society glorify violence to the point we have become desensitized to it and the consequences?

Sears:
[174]I think the problem is that we don't adequately show the responsibility for violence. Someone sees it on TV and doesn't see that it has consequences. So they don't think about anything except gratification if/when they commit a violent act. So much of tv/film has violence for the sake of eye candy. It is pointless violence. If there is a point for it, then that is debatable. If there is no point to it, then it is doing a disservice. It's supposed to be Good VERSUS Evil. Not Good AND Evil.

Interviewer:
[175]What is your motto?

Sears:
[176]I don't have one. Darn. I have a logo, though, does that count?

Interviewer:
[177]Do fans matter?

Sears:
[178]Well, yeah. On many many levels. The obvious one is ratings. But there are fans and there are OH-MY-GOD-FANS!!!!! The regular fans are the audience members who provide our Neilsen ratings and buy the toys. The OMGF!!! Are the ones who keep us honest, who are affected by what we do, who make the phone calls to the stations, who come to the conventions, and ask the darndest questions.

Interviewer:
[179]What do you think actors take themselves too seriously?

Sears:
[180]Hmm... do you mean WHY do I think they do, or what do I think OF the ones who do? I'll answer both. I don't think all actors do. But what they (and any artist) do is an undefinable profession. People can teach you the mechanics of Acting, but you either have the gift or you don't. And not being able to quantify that drives actors crazy. Mainly because you don't know how to fix it if it stops working. And you will only know that when they stop hiring you. So I think most Actors are very very serious about their work because they can't believe in their own gift. Face it, if it is something that you didn't have to work for, you take it for granted. But Actors can't take it for granted because the work is so fleeting. Also, there is a tendency for some Actors to get frustrated when they are type-cast. I've seen this a lot. Especially with comedy Actors. They want to prove that they are multi-dimensional but no one will give them a chance. So they go all moody on you to prove they are "deep".

[181]Now, what do I think of those who DO take themselves seriously? It depends on the degree. If they do it to the point that they think they are better than others, then I don't think very much of them and have less use for them. They become too big fer their britches, as we used to say.

[182]Hollywood is a psychological minefield. It's easy to fall prey to these things. The real trick to Hollywood is staying grounded. Not an easy thing to do.

Interviewer:
[183]What questions should I have asked? Then answer them.

Sears:
[184]That one. And I just did.


Steve's Résumé

Steve's website is http://www.pondalee.com

Writer

Sheena (2000) TV Series (creator) (writer)

Xena: Warrior Princess (1995) TV Series (writer)

Walker, Texas Ranger (1993) TV Series (writer) (episode "Case Closed (1995)

Swamp Thing (1990) TV Series (writer)

The A-Team (1985) TV Series (writer)

Riptide (1984) TV Series (writer)

Hardcastle and McCormick (1985) TV Series

Producer

Sheena (2000) TV Series (executive producer)

Xena: Warrior Princess (1995) TV Series (co-executive producer) (supervising producer)

Raven (1992) TV Series (producer)


Acknowledgments

Thanks to Kamouraskan for the beta.






Articles

L. J. Maas and Murphy Wilson [Amy Murphy].One Step Beyond ... Uber, That Is. WHOOSH #49 (October 2000)

The "Inside the Head of..." series in Whoosh issues #58, 61-66,68-






Biography

a woman of mystery Amy Murphy
Thirty-one-year-old Amy Murphy resides in Indiana, and is an avid reader of Xena: Warrior Princess Fan Fiction. If it exists in the Xenaverse, chances are she has read it! Murphy has also tried her hand at writing fan fiction, turning out two very nice pieces that reside on a couple of web sites throughout the Xenaverse.


Favorite episode: IS THERE A DOCTOR IN THE HOUSE (24/124)
Favorite line: "I Have Many Skills" Various episodes
First episode seen: TITANS (07/107)
Least favorite episode: LYRE, LYRE HEARTS ON FIRE (100/510)

 

 

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